If you have a favorite Palm Springs restaurant and love to save money, now is the perfect time to order takeout.

The City of Palm Springs, the Palm Springs Bureau of Tourism, and the Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce launched a new coupon initiative on Tuesday that supports local restaurants while giving diners a price break. All you have to do is visit the Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce website, and print a $10 off coupon, good for to-go orders of $30 or more at participating restaurants. The restaurants will then be reimbursed the $10 by the city.

This coupon can be used as often as you want, but does not work with third-party delivery services. For a list of participating restaurants, visit the Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce website (https://pschamber.org), and check back often to see if your fave has been added to the list. It could also be time to give that restaurant you’ve always wanted to try a shot!

We recommend ordering from Azucar at La Serena Villas. Serving lunch and dinner, Azucar offers an eclectic assortment of dishes — from a Dungeness crab stuffed poblano to mesquite-dusted swordfish — and several items can be made vegan or gluten free. Their cocktail list is also fabulous, with the blood orange margarita a must-try.

Some of our other favorite participating restaurants, all within walking distance of many boutique hotels, include: Eight4Nine, Farm Restaurant, and  On the Mark Palm Springs.

Palm Springs has your stay…and your eats!

One night each winter, several distinctive boutique hotels in Palm Springs take part in the Walk of Inns, opening their doors to welcome all visitors.

This annual event, now in its 23rd year, is a free, self-guided walking tour and fun way for the public to get to know the eclectic properties in the neighborhoods between Ramon Road and Tahquitz Canyon Way.

The 2018 Walk of Inns is set for Thursday, Dec. 13, from 5 to 8 p.m., with the Palm Springs Art Museum, 101 Museum Way, serving as the official starting point. There, you can drop off unwrapped toys for Toys for Tots and Well in the Desert, plus pick up a free map of all the stops and a small flashlight.

A number of Palm Springs Preferred Small Hotels are participating in the Walk of Inns, including Casa Cody Country Inn, Old Ranch Inn, Orbit In, Korakia Pensione, Amin Casa, The Three Fifty Hotel, La Serena Villas, and the Del Marcos Hotel, with more being added every day.

The Splendor of Boutique Hotel Architecture

These hotels showcase the spectacular architecture that has made Palm Springs famous, from mid-century modern to Mediterranean. Casa Cody Country Inn is the oldest operating hotel in Palm Springs, founded in the 1920s by Harriet Cody, Buffalo Bill’s cousin, while the Orbit In is a  retro flashback to the swinging ’50s and ’60s, complete with a Boomerang Bar.

The Walk of Inns is their time to shine, with 2,000 people taking the tour in 2017. Every year, Amin Casa owners Ramon Bautista and Nelson Cooley enjoy getting to meet attendees and introducing them to their historic resort, which dates back to the 1920s.

“Originally built by Pearl McCallum McManus, it became Gloria Swanson’s residence for 12 years,” Bautista said. “We will give a history of the property and highlight plantings around the grounds that are original to the estate.”

The reaction from visitors is “always 100 percent positive,” Cooley said. “Typically people are thrilled that we have renovated and restored this historic property while maintaining many of the original features. They are thankful that we potentially saved it from the wrecking ball as the property would have been a developer’s dream.”

The Walk of Inns is free and open to everyone. It is recommended that participants wear comfortable shoes. The tour can start at any of the stops, including the Palm Springs Women’s Club, which will feature live entertainment and a bake sale. For more information, please call 760-320-9346.

In the desert, one of the best times to take the bikes out is early in the day. And many boutique hotels offer free loaner bikes to make it super easy for you to get around town or explore the canyons before the sun is high.

If you want to really explore the desert, Evan Trubee, owner of Big Wheel Tours, offers The Earthquake Canyon Express – Riders are treated to a geologic extravaganza on this 20-mile tour that descends through the heart of the San Andreas Fault zone on a paved road to the heart of grape country near Mecca.

There are no cross roads, no turns, and very little traffic which makes this a relaxing sightseeing adventure. Even the non-athletic can handle this ride but Evan offers electric bikes for those who need an extra boost.  And he takes care of everything from bikes, helmets, water bottles, snacks, and refreshments to knowledgeable guides and support vehicles.

Santiago Resort’s Bike Recommendations

Our friends at the Santiago Resort have put together a list of adventures that might be just the inspiration you need to jump on a bike during your next stay.

Twin Palms Neighborhood – One of the best “hidden gem” neighborhoods of Palm Springs! It is filled with beautiful mid-century homes that are so well taken care of, you can really feel the homeowner and neighborhood pride. Twin Palms is between La Verne Way, Palm Canyon and Camino Real, creating a perfect triangular neighborhood of very awesome homes.

Moorten Botanical Garden– This quirky little garden was created by Clark Chester “Cactus Slim” Moorten and his wife, Patricia. Cactus Slim was an original Keystone Cop and a stand-in for Howard Hughes. It is still in the family and is now run by his son, Chester. Thousands of specimens sourced from all over the world are represented here, yet the one-acre gardens retain a homey intimacy.

Moorten Botanical Garden
1701 S. Palm Canyon Dr.
Summer Hours 9AM — 1PM: Friday, Saturday, Sunday only
Winter Hours: 10AM — 4PM daily (closed Wednesdays)

Mesquite Bike Trail- Start out along the S Riverside wash trail, then at Sunrise and Sunny Dunes you will find the entrance to this fun, short trail at the beginning of the Mesquite Country Club & Condos.  You can ride through to see the entire Mesquite golf course and the area that is currently being considered the Mesquite Desert Preserve. You end up on El Cielo, and you can loop back through back streets of the neighborhoods ‘Los Compadres’ (a 70’s Neighborhood) and ‘Deepwell’.

Sherman’s Deli –Sherman’s Deli is a true Palm Springs Institution. They have a fantastic “NY Deli Style” menu that includes Jewish deli favorites like bagels and lox, matzo ball soup, potato latkes, and many more traditional breakfast favorites. The front patio sits in morning shade, and they have a bike rack right in front to make lock up very easy! Best of all, they open at 7:00 AM so you can beat the heat back to your hotel’s swimming pool.

 

Here’s a handy map to download of Palm Springs bike routes and trails.

Get out there and enjoy the ride!

 

Not only does Palm Springs beckon one to come to visit for its countless sunshine days, but there is also a new reason to plan your vacation to this increasingly hip town. At least once a week, contemporary public art is being unveiled.

Palm Springs is quiet and has crispness in the air as one ventures out to get a cup of coffee on Palm Canyon at our downtown Starbucks. Clamoring for your attention is the PS I Love Letters, with its brilliant red color glistens in the filtered sunlight through the palm trees. It’s the perfect place to take an Instagramable photo.

Nona Watson, CEO of Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce, conceived the artwork. She enlisted the design talents of Maru Palmersheim, and Palm Spring Canyon Print and Grit Development provided the space.

(This particular morning, a family of three was standing near the sign. The little girl was having fun frolicking around the sign, so we thought she would be the perfect model. The mother later sent us an email requesting a copy of the photo. She is pianist Jeewon Park.)

Unity, a mural with Inaugural Poet Amanda Gorman’s portrait, graces one of the “art pit” walls at the corner of Belardo Road and Museum Way.  This temporary art installation will be there through December 2021.

MisterAlex, a Los Angeles-based artist, depicted Amanda surrounded by butterflies. “During my research of Amanda, I discovered she overcame a speech impediment. In addition, during her young life, she dedicated her many hours of hard work to bring people together; thus, I chose Unity for the theme.”

The Fault Line Meditation

Curator and artist, Jevpic considers himself a fortunate man. During the pandemic, he received his largest commission ever. While digging in the “art pit” to create this art installation, many local people supported him. They picked up shovels and helped him develop his vision, which looks entirely different during the day than it does at night.

In Jevpic words, “The path in the shape of the San Andres Fault is a metaphor for the faults we encounter in our life. Faults have existed before us and will be after us. Just learn, grow and move on.”

Guadalajara Artist Gonzalo Lebrija‘s temporary creation, History of Suspended, is directly in front of the Palm Springs Art Museum. The Palm Springs Art Commission worked with the museum to prepare the space and erect the art installation referred to as “A Moment for the Impossible.”

Lebrija wants to encourage thought “suspension of the passage of time – focusing on the precise moment of stillness and impact. This installation encourages one to walk around and even visit at different times of the day. The reflection in the pool also calls one to reflect on the time and space around them.

MIDABI, a Palm Springs artist who has his art in front of the Desert Center Art Center, now came up with another relevant sign. WOW on Indian Canyon Drive, near Andreas, cannot help but make you smile.  When is the last time you saw art that says, “Wow?”

His metal, esoteric sculptures are created using his thought process:  a. Always be a student b. Have a heart of a child and c. Remember you are a human being first and foremost before any other identity.

Popsicles is a temporary art installation near Townie Bagels on Sunny Dunes by Salina, California artist John Cerney. John is known as the “cutout artist” for his larger-than-life creations along California and Midwest highways. This a great place to capture selfies for your social media.

John started as a portrait artist, then began drawing. He noticed barren walls and old barns with expansive walls and convinced owners murals would enhance their spaces. The next step was designing a way for more people to see his figures. At first, he made the life size, but they realized they were not big enough for people to see as they whizzed by on the highways. Thus, these plywood cutouts are now bigger than life.

Besides a vibrate art scene, retail shops are thriving, and new restaurants are popping up everywhere. If you haven’t been to Palm Springs, you are sure to see lots of changes, including constructing the 1.5 acres of new City Park being built steps away from the Palm Springs Art Museum.

So find your stay, maybe even take advantage of a summer special and make your reservation today.

Can you take a dark-brown cement bench and turn it into art while still maintaining its function for resting or people-watching? The answer in Palm Springs is an unequivocal, yes.

Mainstreet Palm Springs’ Downtown and Uptown Business Association have upgraded the benches throughout the entire area thanks to a grant by the Palm Springs Art Commission. Local artists, representing  the culture and diversity of  the valley, were each paid a stipend for giving a new look and life to 70 benches, including 8 at the Palm Springs International Airport.

Initially, local artist Tysen Knight was commissioned to paint ten benches to test the concept. And they were a big hit. Functional and eye-catching, the colorful benches became the focus of many visitors’ photos. With the success of the first phase, phase two was approved.

Each bench looks like this before it receives its new life. As you can see, the artists have a blank canvas to design and apply their art.

A before shot of the plain brown benches have been transformed by local artists.

A before shot of the plain brown benches have been transformed by local artists.

Here are examples of the benches created by our local artists from our culturally diverse community.

Abe Alvarez Tostado

Abe Alvarez Tostado colorful bench in Palm Springs evokes community heart and unity.

A resident of Yucca Valley. In his younger years, he was interested in comics. Then with his Mom, who was an artist, he started going to art galleries. His artistic talents were encouraged by friends that surrounded him at Long Beach, California. He has painted murals in San Francisco, Long Beach, Los Angeles, San Diego, and Palm Springs for over 30 years. 

Susan Gresto

Artist Susan Gresto’s bench in iconic Palm Springs hues of oranges and blues features free-spirited winged humans greeting one another.

A resident of Palm Springs. It brings her great joy to mentor students, support community art programs. Her work has been exhibited and sold at the Palm Springs Art Museum Store, University of California Riverside, the Community Gallery at Palm Desert City Hall, Indio Senior Center, and CREATE Center for the Arts Palm Desert.  

Tim J Leary

Tim Leary created a bold geometric and linear bench design.

A resident of Indio.  His work as a visual merchandiser spanned 28 years and three states: Florida, Connecticut, and California. After moving to San Francisco, he completed his formal education, studying spirituality and art, and art therapy. He has a studio in the Backstreet Art District in Palm Springs.

Jessica Frederic

A bright lime-green bench with palm fronds and yellow and black birds came to life by artist Jessyca Frederick.

A resident of La Quinta. After years of searching, she now uses her creativity and problem-solving skills to create art. With encouragement from friends and artists, this bench is her first piece of public art.

Paul Kole

Paul Kole created a word-art bench with a bright white background and multi-colored letters that remind visitors of the joys found in Palm Springs.

He resides in Orange County, Palm Springs, Arizona, and International resort stay-cations. His abstract work on wood and other materials are in the United States and international collections. He has a working studio in Palm Desert, California.

Stroll up and down Canyon Drive to see these creative benches. They most certainly will bring a smile to your face. Oh, if you need to stop and rest, be our guest, and remember, we have great people-watching in Palm Springs.

Wake up in Palm Springs with the sun gloriously shining and grab your glamorous floppy hat, recyclable water bottle, and sunglasses. It doesn’t matter if the museums are closed because there’s so much fabulous public art to explore in Palm Springs.

Start your walking tour in the Uptown Design District on North Palm Canyon.

First Stop – Palm Springs Desert Art Center

The center for Palm Springs creative arts is the Desert Art Center at 550 N Palm Canyon Dr, Palm Springs, CA 92262. Often overlooked, this grand building is the home for numerous art classes, exhibits, and theatre performances. One of our city’s latest art installations is on the Desert Center’s palatial grass-covered lawn.

MIDABI is an artist and philosopher focused on large-scale public art using text in sculptures and murals. Residing in Palm Springs since 1998, with family roots going back to the 1950s, MIDABI continues a family tradition of contributing artistically to the desert.

Large, bold, and thought-provoking, MIDABI creates works of art that seek to inspire and challenge the viewer to think for themselves and see reality differently. One may feel shaken, for emotional core values may be questioned.

Since you have your walking shoes on, head on down Palm Canyon; along the way, you will see colorful benches to rest upon, which our local artists created.

Second Stop – Koffi North

If you want to have a cup of coffee, you might want to stop at Koffi North. Be sure to go straight through the store to the back and see the courtyard. The locals hang out here during non-Covid times.

Third Stop – Near the Palm Springs Art Museum

Now that your energy is restored, head down to Museum Way and turn right.

Before you get to the Palm Springs Art Museum and located in what we locals call the “Sand Pit,” (and future home of an underground parking lot) are ten sculptures, 11 ft long X 9-foot fiberglass babies. A barcode replaces any semblance of a face.

Czech artist David Cerny has loaned this art installation to Palm Springs through 2022. He wanted to make a statement about the dehumanization of society due to big tech and data. We are betting you will have an opinion.

Check out the wall on your left as you overlook the Sand Pit. You’ll spot a mural by Santa Monica artist, Peter Tigler, who worked with attendees of all ages to create this 7-foot-tall-by15-wide mural at the Annual La Quinta Arts Festival in 2019. Look closely; it was created by finger painting. The bright colors and numerous scenes invoke the sense of “Wish you were here.” It’s a great place to take a selfie to post your social media.

Fourth Stop – Graffiti Park

Across the street from the Sand Pit is our Graffiti Park. While waiting for the area to be developed, artists are encouraged to express themselves through their art. The various cement pillars and stones, remnants of past construction, serve as canvases. The art is constantly changing, so be sure to come back and see it on your next visit.

Fifth Stop – Right Side of Palm Springs Art Museum

The Palm Springs Art Museum is closed, but the parking lot holds a surprise. Check out the Road Signs scattered throughout the premises. They were created by artist Gerald Clark, who identifies himself first as an artist; and secondly, a Cahuilla Indian.

These Road Signs were created for an exhibit of his work in the Palm Springs Art Museum a couple of years ago. Walk to the museum’s right side first, then see the rest of them on the museum’s left side.

Sixth Stop – Left Side of the Palm Springs Art Museum

After you have pursued both sides of the museum, you will see a large semi-truck parked in the parking lot. In the semi is a three-story all-metal house, called the Aluminare House, designed by Albert Frey and A. Lawrence Kocher. The house was donated to the Palm Springs Art Museum for its permanent collection and will be reassembled in 2021. It is considered to be one of the most outstanding examples of Modernist architecture in the world.

We hope you have enjoyed this tour of some of our public art. There are many more installations–both inside and outside–scattered throughout the city. However, we wanted to give you a small taste of the many treasures that await your visit to Palm Springs.